Monthly Archives: June 2013

A Photo Editor

A Photo Editor

 

I really enjoy this blog by a magazine photography director, Rob Haggart. It’s mostly an appraisal of great magazine design, layout and photography, but also includes or points to topics of interest that anyone in the field of photography would find worth reading.

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Exercise – Implied Lines

Two things to bear in mind are that the eyes follow a line, and that it also tries to construct a line from appropriate suggestions as clear line provides a natural path for the eye, which moves along it. The more active the line, the stronger the encouragement for the eye to follow it, hence diagonals and curves work better in this way than verticals and horizontals.

• The Art Of Photography  (OCA course book), Part 2, Using Lines In Composition, p.81

Requirements:

Part 1: Look at the two provided photographs and find the implied lines by way of indications or arrows.

Part 2: Select three already taken photographs and find the implied lines in each.

Part 3: Take two new photographs that each contain either an eye line or the extension of a line or lines that point.

 

Part 1

Image 1

Pt2E6-02

In this image the strongest implied lines are suggested by the postures of both the man and the bull. The flow of his cape, and the two principal colours in it also give rise to more implied lines, whose direction seems to flow or point inwards to the centre of the image. The implied line suggested by the bull is mostly due to it’s apparent motion or direction of travel, again to the centre of the image.

Image 2

Pt2E6-01

In this image, the most obvious implied lines are those suggested by the direction in which the man appears to be moving, the eye line of both of the horses (with that being so especially for the horse in the foreground) closest to the man, as well as that of the apparent angle at which the horses appear to be standing or moving at. The strongest line for me is that of the horses postures, as it dominates the image, and is the immediate focus of the eye when first seen. I think the implied lines given by all three subjects makes for a very compact image, and helps to focus attention on the very dynamic quality of the image as a whole.

 

Part 2

Photo 1

ISO400, 98mm, f/5.6, 1/50sec Glass bottles embedded in wall

ISO400, 98mm, f/5.6, 1/50sec
Glass bottles embedded in wall

In this photo the alignment of the bottles gives rise to very many combinations of implied lines, with not all being indicated. The grouping of the bottles as a whole also suggest some directionality, as in pointing upwards.

 

Photo 2

ISO640, 105mm, f/11, 1/320sec
Boats on Fewa Lake.
Pokhara, Nepal

The implied lines in this photo are much simpler, and maybe not as clear, certainly not as strong as in the previous photo.  The line up of the thin poles leading into the lake is principal to the image as a whole, but the boat in the background suggests movement in a certain direction, whether it is actually doing so or not.

 

Photo 3

ISO400, 26mm, f/5.6, 1/640sec A procession of women celebrating a local festival

ISO400, 26mm, f/5.6, 1/640sec
A procession of women celebrating a local festival.
Chapagaun, Kathmandu, Nepal

The strongest element of the implied lines in this photo is chiefly one of direction. The women all face the same direction, though their slow movement forward may not be so apparent.

 

Part 3

Photo 1

ISO800, 58mm, f/5, 1/4000sec Signpost to the world Kakani, Nepal

ISO800, 58mm, f/5, 1/4000sec
Signpost to the world
Kakani, Nepal

The implied lines are are clear as the the arrows of direction. It is natural to extend ones gaze to follow the indications into the distance, especially when presented with a wider view.

 

Photo 2

ISO400, 105mm, f/5.6, 1/1250 Microwave relay mast, Jhamsikhel, Kathmandu, Nepal

ISO400, 105mm, f/5.6, 1/1250
Microwave relay mast.
Jhamsikhel, Kathmandu, Nepal

Unless you knew what this is, one might not notice or recognise the implied lines in this image, certainly not as readily as in the previous photo. Here the wire mesh dishes of a microwave relay mast imply direction, pointing to where signals are being sent or received from.

 

It took me a while to get the point of the exercise, despite it being readily described. Maybe I somehow lack the ability to see implied lines in photos, they are not always apparent to me. At least one thing it has taught me is to probe deeper into an image for them, especially when need requires.

 

Exercise – Curves

Curves, like diagonals, have a sense of movement and direction, and is some ways can be considered a kind of diagonal line. Because they pull the eye in, they are useful in planned composition. Curves have associations of smoothness, grace and elegance, and so add these feelings to an image.

• The Art Of Photography  (OCA course book), Part 2, Curves, p.80

Requirement: Look for and take photographs containing curves that emphasise movement or direction – (4 photographs)

Photo 1

ISO400, 105mm, f/5.6, 1/400sec

ISO400, 105mm, f/5.6, 1/400sec
Wind toy

I think the curves in this composed photograph give a sense of movement. It may not be obvious in this view that is part of a wind-driven toy, but the whole structure of it is meant to impart movement.

Photo 2

ISO125, 105mm, f/5.6, 1/30sec
The Imperial Queen’s Park Hotel, Bangkok, Thailand

I like the simple and obviously functional curvature of this building.

Photo 3

ISO1600, 80mm, f/5.3, 1/20sec
Concrete and brick sculpture, Benjasiri Park, Bangkok, Thailand

A section of a sculpted structure, that in whole formed two simple ovals.

Photo 4

ISO200, 105mm, f/5.6, 1/125sec Fern, Shivapuri Forest, Kathmandu, Nepal

ISO200, 105mm, f/5.6, 1/125sec
Fern, Shivapuri Forest, Kathmandu, Nepal

The gentle organic curves of these fern leaves suggests the constant direction of their typically rapid growth.

Exercise – Diagonals

“Diagonal lines are rather easier to create in a photograph, as they depend mainly on viewpoint. Whereas many scenes contain real horizontals and verticals – streets and buildings, for instance – there are few real diagonals, staircases are one of only a few instances. the camera angle and perspective, however, make dials common in photographs.”

• The Art Of Photography  (OCA course book), Part 2, Diagonals, p.78

Requirement: 4 photographs photographs showing strong diagonals

Photo 1

ISO200, 98mm, f/10, 1/800sec

ISO200, 98mm, f/10, 1/800sec
Cornerstone section of Buddhist stupa

Photo 2

ISO100, 25mm, f/4, 1/500sec

ISO100, 25mm, f/4, 1/500sec
Centrepoint Thung Lo Hotel, Bangkok, Thailand

Photo 3

ISO100, 40mm, f/4.5, 1/500sec

ISO100, 40mm, f/4.5, 1/500sec
Wooden decking around swimming pool

Photo 4

ISO100, 105mm, f/11, 1/160sec

ISO100, 105mm, f/11, 1/160sec
Office building, Bangkok, Thailand